The right water temperature for washing dishes

If you’re wondering what the right water temperature is for washing dishes, you’ve come to the right place.

Let’s see what the peer-reviewed science has to say on the topic.

Water temperature for washing dishes

Best water temperature for washing dishes

Some people believe that a higher water temperature will get dishes cleaner and remove more germs than a lower temperature.

Is there any truth to it?

Researchers at Ohio State University found that hot water isn’t necessary to get clean dishes and reduce germs.

Their study revealed that washing dishes with cooler water achieved “comparable” results to washing dishes with hot water.

Both methods removed food residue and microbes well enough to meet the FDA’s stringent standards.

Other studies back up this claim.

A research team at Rutgers University conducted experiments to investigate the best water temperature for washing dishes, specifically to remove germs.

Between the three water temperatures tested – 60, 79, and 100 degrees Fahrenheit – the results were clear.

All three water temperatures proved equally effective at removing microbes.

In so many words, there’s no point washing the dishes with hot water. Cool water gets the job done.

If you’ve been using excessively hot water temperatures for washing dishes, it’s time to start saving energy by switching to cooler water instead.

And in addition to saving energy, there’s another bonus that comes with that:

No more dry hands! Lukewarm water doesn’t strip the fats and special proteins on your skin like hot water does.

And if you want to take an additional step to get softer hands while doing the dishes, use the best dish soap for keeping your hands soft without any harsh chemicals.

Can hot water kill the coronavirus on dishes?

As of May 2020, there’s no proof that hot water helps kill the coronavirus when doing the dishes.

But according to scientists, there’s another way to ensure no coronavirus remains on your dishes.

According to the American Chemical Society, all you need is soap.

Why?

Because soap has the ability to break down fats.

And since the coronavirus’s exterior contains fat, once it’s covered and infiltrated by soap, the virus starts to break down fast.

The video below illustrates what happens to the coronavirus when you wash your hands with soap.

 

 

The same concept applies to washing dishes with soap.

This is the superpower of soap against the coronavirus, and that’s what you need for washing your dishes.

Does the water temperature for washing dishes need to be extremely hot to kill the coronavirus?

No – using soap with room-temperature water gets the job done.

But if you want to make sure your hands stay smooth and don’t dry out while doing the dishes, then you should check out this all-natural dish soap.

We think you’re going to love it.

One final tip

Cool room-temperature water will get your dishes sparkling clean.

And before you go, here’s one more tip.

Stop covering your dishes with harsh petrochemicals and other carcinogens.

Confused by what we mean by that?

Just read the ingredients on your dish soap bottle and you’ll understand.

That stuff ends up all over your family’s dishes, and any residue mixes in with your next meal.

Watch the video:

 

Gross!

But there’s a better way.

Check it out right here.

(When you make a purchase from links in this post we might receive a small commission at no additional cost to you.)




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